When going through the team building process, coaches ideally would want to have captains in their program. Sometimes having captains don’t work out for a team, but to those teams that do have captains, there is a natural assumption that you should warn your captains about.

Team building is already a messy, dynamic process…if you realize that your team needs to have a change in mindset also then you don’t have the luxury to fall for this assumption.

1) A captain is there only to solve internal problems
Captains do try to regulate internal problems on the team. What I’ve found is that without pointing out the importance of being proactive in finding things for the team to bond over, a captain just waits until a problem pops up…then tries to mend the relationships.

Have you ever left your house, apartment or dorm room excited about doing some workout in the gym and by the time you get there you realize that you forgot your sneakers? You gotta go get them…quickly! And take the time to go back to pick them up.

You just spent that extra energy to do something that if you just had a list of things you needed for the gym or you had already packed your bag, the wasted time wouldn’t have happened.

The results are the same – you got your sneakers with you, but the time wasted you can’t get back and now you gotta deal with your frustration also.

It’s the same for captains and their teams. Your program already knows what it needs in order to get to where it wants to go. Captains have to take the time out to list some of the ways they want the team to look and proactively speak with the coaches to find out some creative ways to lead the team. But this comes from viewing the position of captain proactively.

So instead of only looking for problems to fix in the team, you’re looking and creating the avenue for actions the team should be doing that helps your program progress towards its goal! A championship!
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Have you made a list of things that the team should be doing this season?
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